Black History Month

Violinist Richmond Punch will perform at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12, at the Ron Houston Center for the Performing Arts on the campus of Northwest Missouri State University. The free concert, which will also include an appearance by the Northwest Symphony, is part of the school’s annual observance of Black History Month.

MARYVILLE, Mo. — Black History Month events at Northwest Missouri State University will include a concert by violinist Richmond Punch and the school’s traditional Soul Food Dinner.

Both events are open to the public.

Punch will take the stage during a free concert set for 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 12, at the Ron Houston Center for the Performing Arts on the west end of campus.

The evening will also feature a performance by the Northwest Symphony, which will present selections from William Grant Still’s Symphony No. 1 in A-flat, also known as the “Afro-American Symphony.” Assistant Professor of Music Robert Pippin directs.

This year’s Soul Food dinner will begin at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, in the J.W. Jones Student Union Ballroom and will include a presentation by Latrese Adkins Weathersby, a professor and author whose works include “Ethnic Diversity in Religious Practices: The Call of Community Psychology for Exploring the Intersections of Faith and Race” and “Invisible Body, The Catalytic Power of Death in Antebellum Slave Funerals of the U.S. South.” 

Weathersby is also noted for presentations on hip hop culture and the role of African American Churches in promoting social justice.

The menu, comprising traditional African American fare, will include salad, collard greens, fried chicken, fried catfish, candied tams, macaroni with cheese, cornbread and a dessert. 

Doors to the ballroom open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adults and $7 for students and children 6 and older. 

For ticket information, email Director of Diversity and Inclusion Justin Mallett at jmallett@nwmissouri.edu or telephone 660.562.1317.

Celebrated nationwide each February, Black History Month traces its beginnings to Negro History Week, which was established in 1926 by Carter G. Woodson, a historian, author and journalist known as the “father of black history.”

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Staff writer Anthony Brown can be reached at tbrown@maryvilledailyforum.com or by calling the newspaper at 660.562.2424.